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Matt Nettleton | Indianapolis, IN
 

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As an old saying goes, "A tiger can't change his stripes." In nature that is not much of a worry because tigers are not self-aware and do not spend too much time wishing or pretending they are something or someone they are not. Unfortunately, salespeople are self-aware and they spend plenty of time coming up with schemes and ruses designed to keep their prospects from figuring out that they, in fact, are sales people.

As a sales trainer, I often find myself dealing with salespeople who do not want to be responsible for finding prospects, identifying opportunities, and closing new business. Their strong aversion to being called "salespeople" is a telling symptom of this malady. Unfortunately, the primary role in their company is to generate revenue.

The amount of time and energy these people spend trying not to be in sales is amazing. And it is typically the number one barrier to success. The problem comes to a head when these "Business Development Account Specialist Territory Managers" sit in front of clients and prospects and try to have conversations. The prospect sees a salesperson but hears a customer service rep. The disconnect is strong.

Your clients, your prospects, and your co-workers need to know what you are. Sales is an honorable profession. Your clients and prospects need you. But to be of value you must learn to be "Disarmingly Honest and Intensely Curious." If somebody asks, "Are you in sales?" it should be easy to say, "Yes I am, why do you ask?" In other words, as a salesperson you should be what you are. Spend your energy being the best version of what you are. Sound like a salesperson. Look like a salesperson. Be a salesperson. But be really good.

Ready to grow your business and help your people be what they are?

We should talk.

Contact Matt Nettleton, Sandler Training, DTB at matt.nettleton@sandler.com or 317-695-8549.

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